About TFPI

TFPI has been registered in UK and Pakistan. TFPI is a network of concerned idealists who want to make a tangible contribution to achieving peace. We promote the use of dialogue and political engagement, backed up by practical interventions to improve people’s lives, as a way of transforming conflict. More »

PUBLICATIONS

TFPI promotes practical strategies to help achieve peace. We present these strategies in our own briefings and through materials published in a range of outlets. TFPI network members have published widely and are regularly interviewed in mainstream media. Download a selection of recent writing and media on strategies for peace. More »

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Afghan conflict needs robust peacemaking, experts say – National Catholic Reporter publications

After nearly 16 years of armed conflict in which three surges of foreign troops have failed to end the violence, one strategy has never been tried in Afghanistan: robust peacemaking. More »

Facilitating peace process in Afghanistan is in Pakistan’s national interest – Daily Times

During his election campaign, President Trump had vowed to end the foreign wars and redirect the resources towards domestic needs such as infrastructure development. He seems to have reversed his position by announcing that more troops will More »

 

Pakistan, China seek political solution to Afghan conflict – Pajhwok

BEIJING (Pajhwok): Pakistan and China agreed that the solution to the Afghan conflict “has to be fundamentally political”, Pakistani Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif said on Friday.

Asif, who arrived in China at the start of his regional outreach for consultations on the new US policy on Afghanistan and South Asia, addressed a joint press conference after his meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in Beijing.

The Pakistani foreign minister appreciated China’s “constructive role” in the process for a politically negotiated settlement of the Afghan conflict, saying that Pakistan and China can together contribute to a political solution to the conflict.

Answering a question, Asif said he will meet the Afghan foreign minister on …. Read More on Pajhwok

Some countries’ need to give Pakistan credit for its counterterrorism role: China – DAWN News

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, second right, meets with Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing.— AP

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, second right, meets with Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing.— AP

Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif arrived in China on Friday at the start of his regional outreach for consultations on the new US policy on Afghanistan and South Asia.

Addressing a joint press conference after his meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in Beijing, Asif said that the two countries agreed that the solution to the Afghan conflict has to be fundamentally political and that there is no military solution to the issue.

He appreciated China’s “constructive role” in the process for a politically negotiated settlement of the Afghan conflict, saying that Pakistan and China can together contribute to a…. Read More on DAWN News

An Army officer on the US’s new policy for Afghanistan: more misguided strategy – Business Insider

President Donald Trump speaks at Fort Myer about a strategy in Afghanistan. Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Donald Trump speaks at Fort Myer about a strategy in Afghanistan. Carolyn Kaster/AP

The newly announced Afghanistan strategy differs only in style, not substance, from the strategies of the past, and certainly from the current strategy. After 16 years we still lack a coherent strategy, once that aligns ways and means to achieve realistic ends.

It’s true the administration promises to utilize all the elements of American power, but this is a bromide.

While it renounces nation building and timelines (removed in 2014) and emphasizes “killing terrorists,” the new… Read More on Business Insider

Afghan conflict needs robust peacemaking, experts say – National Catholic Reporter publications

Ali Ahmad, 4, sits with his father and relatives at their house after he survived a suicide attack at a mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 27. (Newscom/Reuters/Omar Sobhani)

Ali Ahmad, 4, sits with his father and relatives at their house after he survived a suicide attack at a mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 27. (Newscom/Reuters/Omar Sobhani)

After nearly 16 years of armed conflict in which three surges of foreign troops have failed to end the violence, one strategy has never been tried in Afghanistan: robust peacemaking.

President Donald Trump promised that the plan he announced Aug. 21 would dramatically change the U.S. strategy in Afghanistan and South Asia. But experts in peacebuilding say he is continuing an approach that has failed miserably for more than 15 years while ignoring alternatives that are backed by research and evidence.

Refusing to specify numbers of troops or time frames, Trump committed the U.S. military to continued involvement in Afghanistan, postponed consideration of a political settlement until “after an effective military effort” and said the U.S. would focus on “killing terrorists” rather than… Read More on National Catholic Reporter publications

Access to information essential for building peace in northeastern Afghanistan – Reliefweb

KUNDUZ – During a series of UN-backed televised programmes in Afghanistan’s northeastern region, participants highlighted the importance of access to information as a necessary tool for fighting corruption, defending human rights and fostering peace.

Organized by the Kunduz regional office of the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), the programmes were set up to bring panellists from civil society, provincial government and media outlets together to discuss a broad range of issues around access to information in the northeastern provinces of Kunduz, Takhar and Badakhshan.

Afghanistan has an Access to Information Law that guarantees every citizen the right to know what the government is doing, including on budget allocations for development projects and… Read More on Reliefweb

Trump Is Treating Pakistan Like a Scapegoat for America’s Failures in Afghanistan- The National Interest

The Trump administration believes it can kill its way to victory by ramping up the war effort and keeping the Taliban out of power.

Albert Einstein defined insanity as “doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.” This sums up Pakistan’s perspective of President Donald Trump’s Afghan policy. After sixteen years of war that has cost Americans $1 trillion, Trump has opted for the tried, tested and failed formula of conflict militarization in Afghanistan. At the same time, Trump has called out Pakistan on its duplicity of allegedly “harbouring terrorists” and urged India to play a larger role in stabilizing Afghanistan.

In Pakistan, there is disappointment on Trump’s blame game. Instead of acknowledging Pakistan’s sacrifices in the war on terror that… Read More on The National Interest

Several Taliban Leaders Could Join Peace Process: Gen. Raziq – TOLO News

Kandahar’s police chief said as many as 20 Taliban leaders and commanders have already joined the peace process in Kandahar city.

Kandahar police chief general Abdul Raziq has said that several Taliban leaders and commanders are expected to join the peace process in the near future.

He said recently up to 20 Taliban leaders and commanders joined the peace and reconciliation process in Kandahar city, adding that there is hope that more Taliban commanders and leaders would choose the same path.

When asked about the role of the High Peace Council (HPC) in the talks, Raziq said the tribal elders helped mediate peace negotiation talks with these Taliban leaders who finally agreed to… Read More on Tolo News

Heela Najibullah: From Afghan First Daughter to War Refugee – VOA News

"Losing my father and uncle was not easy, but it certainly made me stronger. Learning to forgive was a very difficult process. It is time-consuming," Heela Najibullah says.

“Losing my father and uncle was not easy, but it certainly made me stronger. Learning to forgive was a very difficult process. It is time-consuming,” Heela Najibullah says.

It’s easy to understand why Heela Najibullah would crave revenge.

Her father, Afghan President Najibullah, was executed by the Taliban, his body and his brother’s dragged by a truck through the streets of Kabul before they were strung up for public display.

But Heela has managed to quell her inner demons. Now an aid worker living in Switzerland, she not only wants peace for her homeland but also hopes to play a role in its reconciliation and the compromises that will have to be made to achieve peace.

“Losing my father and uncle was not easy, but it certainly made me stronger. Learning to forgive was a very difficult process. It is time-consuming,” Heela told VOA in an interview, adding that she saw it as her only choice… Read More on VOA News