Category Archives: Links

Accord – Incremental peace in Afghanistan – Conciliation Resources

A radical new approach is needed in Afghanistan to build peace step-by-step. There needs to be a move beyond peace rhetoric, through a progressive, step-by-step process towards a political settlement which builds stability, confidence and legitimacy over time. The short-term objective should be a reduction in violence. The long-term objective should be to achieve a more inclusive peace process that is representative of, and endorsed by, Afghan …. Read More on Conciliation Resources

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Threat Report 2018: The Afghan Taliban’s Lethal Insurgency – the Cipher Brief

Violence once again grips Afghanistan, with the Taliban, the Islamic State and other terror groups carrying out deadly attacks and kidnappings across the country. Last month, the Taliban announced the beginning of its annual “spring offensive,” and this past weekend bombed a mosque that was being used as a voter registration center, killing 14 and injuring dozens more. 

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Reading the Afghan Taliban: 67 Sources You Should Be Studying

A list of ‘value-added’ sources that offer useful and/or unique information.


Books & Reports

Jere van Dyk’s book contains recollections of time spent in south-eastern Afghanistan (including conversations with Jalaluddin Haqqani) and Kandahar during the early 1980s. Lots of atmospheric description and snippets of discussions. Not definitive, by any means, but useful nonetheless.

This was the first mainstream book published about the Taliban movement in English. It should come as no surprise that Hurst Publishers (in London; also my publisher) were the ones to put it out. This is a fairly variable book in terms of the criteria specified above. Most essays are synoptic in nature rather than based on fieldwork or reporting from Afghanistan itself. Anthony Davis’ essay on the Taliban’s military strategy and tactics is based on time spent on the ground during the early years of the movement’s expansion, though, and offers a lot that isn’t available elsewhere.

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The Taliban’s propaganda activities: how well is the Afghan insurgency communicating and what is it saying?

A SIPRI Project Paper by Tim Foxley*

Summary
International analysts and media alike often claim that current Taliban propaganda efforts are winning over the population in Afghanistan and that this is tipping the balance in favour of the insurgency. Such claims are exaggerated; but because of a perceived failure to provide effective
security and reconstruction, the Afghan Government and international military forces have lost much of the ‘hearts and minds’ initiative that they held in 2002 following the defeat of the Taliban. The Taliban’s own hearts and minds activities are now prolonging and exacerbating an
already difficult insurgency problem for the Afghan Government and the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in the south of the country.

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Afghan Taliban Website

http://shahamat-english.com/

 

 

United Nations Sanctions Committee dealing with the Taliban

The Security Council Committee established pursuant to paragraph 30 of resolution 1988 (2011) oversees the implementation by States of the three sanctions measures (assets freeze, travel ban and arms embargo) imposed by the Security Council on individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with the Taliban in constituting a threat to the peace, stability and security of Afghanistan as designated by the Committee and included on the List accessible on this webpage.

International Crisis Group

The International Crisis Group is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental organisation committed to preventing and resolving deadly conflict.

United States Institute of Peace

USIP is the independent, nonpartisan conflict management center created by Congress to prevent and mitigate international conflict without resorting to violence. USIP works to save lives, increase the government’s ability to deal with conflicts before they escalate, reduce government costs, and enhance our national security