About TFPI

TFPI has been registered in UK and Pakistan. TFPI is a network of concerned idealists who want to make a tangible contribution to achieving peace. We promote the use of dialogue and political engagement, backed up by practical interventions to improve people’s lives, as a way of transforming conflict. More »

PUBLICATIONS

TFPI promotes practical strategies to help achieve peace. We present these strategies in our own briefings and through materials published in a range of outlets. TFPI network members have published widely and are regularly interviewed in mainstream media. Download a selection of recent writing and media on strategies for peace. More »

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11 rebels join peace process in Herat

HERAT CITY (Pajhwok): Nearly a dozen militants on Wednesday joined the peace process in western Herat province, an official said.

Local officials said the reconciling militants had been active against the government in Guzra district.

They laid down their weapons in the presence of the governor and promised partaking in improving the security situation of the province.

Governor Mohammad Asif Rahimi told a ceremony welcoming the former fighters that all rebels should shun insurgency and return to a normal life.

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Iran ready for help on Afghan peace process – Daily Times

ISLAMABAD: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Saturday said that his country was ready to cooperate with Pakistan on peace process in Afghanistan.

The visiting dignitary told a press conference on the conclusion of his two-day tour that Tehran fully agreed to a proposal by Islamabad for holding trilateral talks among Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan on the peace dialogue. “Peace and stability is vital for Afghanistan. We are ready to do whatever we can to help achieve peace and security there,” he said.

President Rouhani said that he and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif had specifically discussed the Afghan issue during Friday talks.

Read More on Daily Times—>

Afghan peace process: Desperation versus strength


The general weariness of the Afghan conflict provides the necessary push for finding a viable peace settlement.

 

Beijing sees the conflict as a typical civil war, a position that is closer to some US pundits and British diplomats who describe it as a tribal warfare among the unruly Afghans, writes Moradian [source:Aljazeerawebsite}

On February 23, diplomats from Afghanistan, Pakistan, China and the United States will meet in Kabul for the fourth round of talks aimed at bringing respite to a troubled land. This quadrilateral process is the latest effort in the long and arduous journey towards an Afghan peace settlement. The pursuit of peace is almost as old as the Afghan conflict itself.

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Reading the Afghan Taliban: 67 Sources You Should Be Studying

A list of ‘value-added’ sources that offer useful and/or unique information.


Books & Reports

Jere van Dyk’s book contains recollections of time spent in south-eastern Afghanistan (including conversations with Jalaluddin Haqqani) and Kandahar during the early 1980s. Lots of atmospheric description and snippets of discussions. Not definitive, by any means, but useful nonetheless.

This was the first mainstream book published about the Taliban movement in English. It should come as no surprise that Hurst Publishers (in London; also my publisher) were the ones to put it out. This is a fairly variable book in terms of the criteria specified above. Most essays are synoptic in nature rather than based on fieldwork or reporting from Afghanistan itself. Anthony Davis’ essay on the Taliban’s military strategy and tactics is based on time spent on the ground during the early years of the movement’s expansion, though, and offers a lot that isn’t available elsewhere.

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The Taliban’s propaganda activities: how well is the Afghan insurgency communicating and what is it saying?

A SIPRI Project Paper by Tim Foxley*

Summary
International analysts and media alike often claim that current Taliban propaganda efforts are winning over the population in Afghanistan and that this is tipping the balance in favour of the insurgency. Such claims are exaggerated; but because of a perceived failure to provide effective
security and reconstruction, the Afghan Government and international military forces have lost much of the ‘hearts and minds’ initiative that they held in 2002 following the defeat of the Taliban. The Taliban’s own hearts and minds activities are now prolonging and exacerbating an
already difficult insurgency problem for the Afghan Government and the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in the south of the country.

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Afghan Taliban Website

http://shahamat-english.com/

 

 

Die vergessenen Flüchtlinge

Die Eroberung von Kundus rückt Afghanistan wieder stärker in den Fokus, nachdem der Konflikt dort in den vergangenen Jahren von Syrien überschattet zu werden schien.

Experten warnen, dass mit dem Vormarsch der Taliban auch mehr afghanische Flüchtlinge nach Europa kommen werden. Schon im  Read More… 

 

 

 

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Rhetoric, Ideology and Organizational Structure of the Taliban Movement

Published: January 5, 2015                         http://www.usip.org
By: Michael Semple                                   Copy of the Post in PDF

This report examines the evolution of the Taliban case for armed struggle and the minimal adjustments Taliban rhetoricians made to cope with the impending political change in Afghanistan in 2014. It considers how the Taliban might make a case for peace, should they take the political decision to engage in negotiations.

Summary

  • The Taliban movement commands the loyalty of thousands of Afghans and applies resources and men to the pursuit of political objectives, guided by doctrine and inspired by rhetoric.
  • Taliban rhetoric consists of religious and historical references, narratives of recent events, and guidance for Taliban sympathizers.
  • The rhetoric asserts that the Taliban are engaged in a righteous jihad aimed at establishing a divinely ordered Islamic system in Afghanistan.
  • Taliban doctrine focuses on internal affairs and in particular on maintaining cohesiveness. The Taliban are ruthless in enforcing their doctrine of obedience to the amir, or leader.
  • The movement has retained a narrow social base, and its power is concentrated in the hands of mullahs from the Kandahari Pashtun tribes.
  • Any project to build a plural Afghanistan is likely to include an appeal to the Taliban or the constituency they have mobilized.

Black flags and balaclavas: how jihadists dress for imaginary war

Source Link:   Author: Michael SempleQueen’s University Belfast

Copy of the Post in PDF

The first thing that I noticed in the gruesome pictures of two gunmen fleeing the scene of their attack on Charlie Hebdo was that the men were dressed from head to toe in black.

It might sound strange, but terrorist couture is a surprisingly relevant detail from which to start making sense of what happened in Paris, and how it connects to other acts of jihadi terrorism worldwide.

The attackers dressed to look like members of a paramilitary force not to trick their way through a security check, but to symbolise their belonging to an army – albeit an imagined one.

Former UN Adviser Talks Taliban’s Future

Source Link

RFE/RL: What is your assessment of Tehrik-e Taliban (TTP) Pakistan after they claimed this week’s horrific attack in Peshawar, massacring some 150 schoolchildren and teachers?

Michael Semple, a former UN and EU adviser in Afghanistan, has studied the Taliban since their emergence in the 1990s. The Irish academic sees the Pakistani Taliban fragmenting into armed criminal gangs while the organizationally strong Afghan Taliban is likely to find peace with Kabul because of their fear of irrelevance.

Michael Semple: The TTP in December 2014 is much weaker than it was before the North Waziristan operation began back in June. As well as having lost its bases, it has suffered multiple leadership challenges and fragmentation. However, most of the key TTP commanders are still in business. They say they are still determined to wage their version of jihad, and the dreadful attack in Peshawar is an expression of that. It is an attack from a position of weakness rather than of strength.