About TFPI

TFPI has been registered in UK and Pakistan. TFPI is a network of concerned idealists who want to make a tangible contribution to achieving peace. We promote the use of dialogue and political engagement, backed up by practical interventions to improve people’s lives, as a way of transforming conflict. More »


TFPI promotes practical strategies to help achieve peace. We present these strategies in our own briefings and through materials published in a range of outlets. TFPI network members have published widely and are regularly interviewed in mainstream media. Download a selection of recent writing and media on strategies for peace. More »


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New Taliban Leader Unlikely To Pursue Peace Talks

The recent U.S airstrike targeting Taliban leader, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, and the appointment of Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada as the new Supreme Leader have raised important questions regarding the development of an More »


The Newsmakers: Negotiating with the Afghan Taliban and the Other Refugee Route



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Top priorities for Haibatullah, new Afghan Taliban leader

(CNN)In the year that he openly led the Afghan Taliban Movement, Akhtar Mohammad Mansour, who was killed by a U.S drone strike Saturday, proved to be a consummate political actor.

After seizing power in a rapidly summoned conclave, he proceeded to consolidate his hold over the movement, deflect attempts by the pro-Taliban clergy (ulema) to question his authority, co-opt or eliminate dissidents, renew the Taliban’s war strategy and defy all efforts to maneuver the Taliban into peace negotiations.
To achieve all of this, Mansour drew on a rich repertoire of stratagems.

Photos: Scene from reported strike on Taliban leaders

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The Taliban replaces its dead leader – and prepares for some tricky internal politics

The May 21 drone strike that killed Taliban leader Akhtar Mohammad Mansoorwas no ordinary assassination; it was an act of armed politics against an acutely political war strategist. The

The scene of the drone strike said to have killed the Taliban’s leader. EPA

Taliban has already named Mansoor’s successor, Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada, and is reassuring its members that the status quo will endure – but Mansoor

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11 rebels join peace process in Herat

HERAT CITY (Pajhwok): Nearly a dozen militants on Wednesday joined the peace process in western Herat province, an official said.

Local officials said the reconciling militants had been active against the government in Guzra district.

They laid down their weapons in the presence of the governor and promised partaking in improving the security situation of the province.

Governor Mohammad Asif Rahimi told a ceremony welcoming the former fighters that all rebels should shun insurgency and return to a normal life.

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Iran ready for help on Afghan peace process – Daily Times

ISLAMABAD: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Saturday said that his country was ready to cooperate with Pakistan on peace process in Afghanistan.

The visiting dignitary told a press conference on the conclusion of his two-day tour that Tehran fully agreed to a proposal by Islamabad for holding trilateral talks among Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan on the peace dialogue. “Peace and stability is vital for Afghanistan. We are ready to do whatever we can to help achieve peace and security there,” he said.

President Rouhani said that he and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif had specifically discussed the Afghan issue during Friday talks.

Read More on Daily Times—>

Afghan peace process: Desperation versus strength

The general weariness of the Afghan conflict provides the necessary push for finding a viable peace settlement.


Beijing sees the conflict as a typical civil war, a position that is closer to some US pundits and British diplomats who describe it as a tribal warfare among the unruly Afghans, writes Moradian [source:Aljazeerawebsite}

On February 23, diplomats from Afghanistan, Pakistan, China and the United States will meet in Kabul for the fourth round of talks aimed at bringing respite to a troubled land. This quadrilateral process is the latest effort in the long and arduous journey towards an Afghan peace settlement. The pursuit of peace is almost as old as the Afghan conflict itself.

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Reading the Afghan Taliban: 67 Sources You Should Be Studying

A list of ‘value-added’ sources that offer useful and/or unique information.

Books & Reports

Jere van Dyk’s book contains recollections of time spent in south-eastern Afghanistan (including conversations with Jalaluddin Haqqani) and Kandahar during the early 1980s. Lots of atmospheric description and snippets of discussions. Not definitive, by any means, but useful nonetheless.

This was the first mainstream book published about the Taliban movement in English. It should come as no surprise that Hurst Publishers (in London; also my publisher) were the ones to put it out. This is a fairly variable book in terms of the criteria specified above. Most essays are synoptic in nature rather than based on fieldwork or reporting from Afghanistan itself. Anthony Davis’ essay on the Taliban’s military strategy and tactics is based on time spent on the ground during the early years of the movement’s expansion, though, and offers a lot that isn’t available elsewhere.

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The Taliban’s propaganda activities: how well is the Afghan insurgency communicating and what is it saying?

A SIPRI Project Paper by Tim Foxley*

International analysts and media alike often claim that current Taliban propaganda efforts are winning over the population in Afghanistan and that this is tipping the balance in favour of the insurgency. Such claims are exaggerated; but because of a perceived failure to provide effective
security and reconstruction, the Afghan Government and international military forces have lost much of the ‘hearts and minds’ initiative that they held in 2002 following the defeat of the Taliban. The Taliban’s own hearts and minds activities are now prolonging and exacerbating an
already difficult insurgency problem for the Afghan Government and the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in the south of the country.

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Afghan Taliban Website




Die vergessenen Flüchtlinge

Die Eroberung von Kundus rückt Afghanistan wieder stärker in den Fokus, nachdem der Konflikt dort in den vergangenen Jahren von Syrien überschattet zu werden schien.

Experten warnen, dass mit dem Vormarsch der Taliban auch mehr afghanische Flüchtlinge nach Europa kommen werden. Schon im  Read More… 




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